the features


MORAVIAN ARTS COME HOME

When Barry and Sybille Sidden built a new Federal-style home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, in 2000, they decided to fill it with locally made Moravian furnishings. They share a mission to preserve these furnishings with the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.

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MAKE MINE A MOCHA

The Pop Art of 19th-Century ceramics, painted, glazed earthenware with brightly colored designs called cat’s eyes, earthworms, seaweed, and twigs was meant as strictly utilitarian. Today, mochaware is a favorite among collectors.

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SHANTIES: CALLS OF THE SEA

The clipper ships and long-sailing whalers that ruled the seas in the 1800s required strong men working together to hoist anchors and sails. Chant-like songs called sea shanties helped keep them in sync during these arduous tasks.

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FOUND IN THE ATTIC

A pair of deep plum heeled shoes and a child’s vest, discovered during roof repairs at Canterbury Shaker Village in New Hampshire, sent historians on a quest to learn who owned and made them—and why they were hidden in the attic.

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AMERICA'S SPICIEST GIFT

Until Columbus sailed west, the fiery flesh of chili peppers was known only to America’s indigenous peoples. The plants spread quickly and globally, and today they flavor the cuisine of several cultures. Chili pepper growers keep trying to turn up the heat.

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COLONIAL WOMEN COUNTERFEITERS

Resourceful women found ways to supplement their household incomes by counterfeiting the earliest versions of America’s paper currency. Despite being punishable by death under British law, only the few who were caught are known, and most escaped severe penalty.

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PAINTED WALLS IN THE CONNECTICUT RIVER VALLEY

The Center for Painted Wall Preservation hosts a tour of four private homes in New Hampshire and Vermont with stunning intact murals that tell stories of their time and offer clues to the possible artists.

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SCALED TO DELIGHT

Miniature furnishings, as finely crafted and detailed as their full-scale counterparts, form part of the exhibition A Gift to the Nation: The Joseph and June Hennage Collection, which celebrates more than 400 decorative arts added to Colonial Williamsburg’s holdings.

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Issue highlights

in every issue


WELCOME

Niches

Jeanmarie Andrews

NEWS

Experts Trace Tattooing to Antiquity

PEOPLE

Wielder of Plane and Pen

PLACES

West Virginia’s Frontier Fort

SKILLS

Haymaking Day

EVENTS

Laura Amick

EVENTS

Laura Amick

STYLE

Stained

Tess Rosch

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