HOME
ADVERTISING
BUSINESS
CIRCULATION
DIRECTORY
EDITORIAL
SHOPPING

JUNE 2020

Contents

Editors Letter

Sources

Calendar

Ad Index

Buy a Copy

INTERACT

Subscribe

Reader Exchange

Write Us

Submit Event

Suggest Home

ARCHIVES

Index

Back Issues

Buyers’ Guides

FOR WRITERS

Guidelines

Photo Guide

Stylebook


the features


TRANSITIONAL YELLOW WARE

In the late 1820s, immigrant potters from Britain’s Staffordshire district established dozens of pottery works in America. For nearly a century, many of them produced utilitarian yellow earthenware that bridged the gap between fragile redware and later white wares.

See Sources

Make Comment

Read Comments

FAMILY TRADITION

Adeline and Joe DiPasqua bought their first and only home in 1969, looking back to the 18th Century as much of the rest of the country looked ahead. They’ve spent a lifetime adapting their suburban Ohio home to colonial times though hard work and creative collecting.

See Sources

Make Comment

Read Comments

MAKING A PERIOD KNIFE

In the 18th and early 19th Centuries, Americans would have imported most of their finished goods from Europe. A Directory artisan shows us how early smiths might have crafted knives for their own use from local or recycled materials.

See Sources

Make Comment

Read Comments

A MASSACHUSETTS COLONIAL RE-IMAGINED

When built in 1771, attorney John Sprague’s impressive two-storey home in Lancaster, Massachusetts, epitomized the popular Georgian style. Today its spacious rooms provide the backdrop for Victor and Donna Gulotta’s collection of art and antiquities.

Sources

Make Comment

Read Comments

OF FLAGS AND RATTLESNAKES

Though its origins are murky, a flag bearing the symbol of a rattlesnake emerged as a powerful symbol of Americans’ determination to steer their own course as they battled Britain for independence.

Sources

Make Comment

Read Comments

A REVOLUTIONARY MIND

Immigrant Englishman Thomas Paine penned the words that ignited revolutionary fervor across the colonies, speaking to the common man in language he could understand and embrace. New research suggests authors of the Declaration of Independence borrowed liberally from Paine’s Common Sense.

See Sources

Make Comment

Read Comments

A VISIT TO OLD YORK, MAINE

Founded in the early 1600s, the village renamed York established itself as a shipping port and hub of provincial government. Today the popular vacation site boasts southern Maine’s largest collection of historic properties and objects.

See Sources

Make Comment

Read Comments

ALABAMA MEMORIES

A graceful antebellum home in Tuscumbia, Alabama, dresses up for a spring wedding. We share the homeowner’s ideas for adorning your period home with floral arrangements for special occasions.

See Sources

Make Comment

Read Comments

COLONIAL GRACE

A reader shares photos of her parents’ private Georgia home, a tribute to memories of growing up learning period skills because “My Dad likes to do things the colonial way.”

Sources

Make Comment

Read Comments

GOLD IN NORTH CAROLINA

According to local lore, the heavy yellow rock young Conrad Reed lugged home in 1799 sparked America’s first gold rush. While some panned for gold in the creeks, investors set up operations for underground mining. Over the course of a century, North Carolina mines produced the equivalent of $3 to $5 billion.

See Sources

Make Comment

Read Comments

ACCURATE APRONS

Colonial women and numerous tradesmen wore this practical garment while they worked. An 18th-Century example from Colonial Williamsburg, a rare survivor of heavy use, enables today’s re-enactors to see what they were made of—and how.

See Sources

Make Comment

Read Comments

Issue highlights

in every issue


WELCOME

The Collector

Jeanmarie Andrews

PLACES

Fort Frederick

SKILLS

Catching the Blues

EVENTS

Laura Amick

STYLE

Veiled

Tess Rosch

ON THE COVER

Interpreters Jennifer Farley and Derek Carpenter from Reed Gold Mine State Historic Site pan for gold along Little Meadow Creek near Midland, North Carolina, where gold was first discovered in the United States. Photo courtesy of Reed Gold Mine State Historic Site, North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

EALonline.com Copyright 2020 Firelands Media Group LLC