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OCTOBER 2019

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THE MISUNDERSTOOD "BIBLE" BOX

No period person ever called a bible box that. At first they were “desks,“ and as the writing desk evolved, simple boxes were regarded as exactly that. We trace the history of both the language and the objects through the centuries.

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BUILDING ON THE PAST

Priscilla Pultz knew exactly what she wanted in a period home, so she decided to build one after studying museum homes and their decor. With her late husband, Albert, she raised a family of seven in her colonial-style masterpiece in Skaneateles, New York.

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MAKE A GARDENER'S POTPOURRI

Through the centuries people have loved the scent of sweet spices and pungent botanicals in their homes. Two herbalist-florists with decades of experience show how you can blend your favorite aromas to create your personal potpourri.

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FOR THE LOVE OF A HOUSE

Peter Cyr fell in love with Maine’s 1817 Blazo-Leavitt House at first glance, but fifty years passed before he had the chance to buy it. Once he did, he turned it into a showplace for his collection of period antiques as befitted the home’s original grandeur.

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PENNSYLVANIA GERMAN FOLK ART FINDS A NEW HOME

Pennsylvanians of German heritage are noted for turning everyday objects—chests, furniture, even documents—into works of folk art. The new Center for Pennsylvania German Studies in a former Montgomery County tavern shows the full range of distinctive styles among these folk artists.

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STORIES IN THE WARNER HOUSE

One of the earliest urban brick houses in New England, the 1718 Warner House in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, has been a museum since 1930. Recent updates have brought new life to its spectacular murals, colorful woodwork, and range of period styles.

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"A DAY MUCH TO BE REMEMBERED"

Coming from England’s temperate climate, the first immigrants to New England found its hot summers and cold winters surprising—but not nearly as much as the August hurricane that blew through in 1635. Today this great storm is recognized as the worst ever, according to eyewitness reports and modern science.

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PIRATES, TO ARMS!

Most pirates preferred fear to fighting—they would rather frighten ships’ crews into giving up their valuable cargo, but they would attack when they had to. Pirates used any weapon at hand, but the cutlass and musketoon were particularly suited to close-quarters fighting.

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AMERICA'S SILK QUILT CRAZE

America once had a thriving silk industry, successful enough that silk became affordable enough for factory girls to stitch it into Sunday dresses or showpiece quilts, many with crazy designs. The National Museum of American History puts its best examples on display.

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Issue highlights

in every issue


WELCOME

Snap Decisions

Jeanmarie Andrews

PEOPLE

Dynamic Curator Christian Goodwillie

PLACES

School of Life in the Blue Ridge Mountains

SKILLS

Gathering Leeches

EVENTS

Laura Amick

STYLE

Unexpectedly

Tess Rosch

ON THE COVER

New York native Priscilla Pultz remembers growing up in an 1818 Dutch house, and when it came time to settle her family for good in Skaneateles, she combined those memories with years of studying early historic architecture to design her own colonial-style home with a second-floor overhang. Photograph by Winfield Ross.

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