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OCTOBER 2018

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AMERICA'S INDIGENOUS FOLK ART

Sewn and hooked rugs—first made to keep northerners warm—became folk art in the hands of rural housewives in 19th-Century Maine. Modern rug hookers continue the tradition today. The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum explores its roots here and in a new exhibition.

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COMFORTABLE IN THE 18TH CENTURY

Jim and Pam Penny’s passion for colonial style blossomed at Colonial Williamsburg, so they bought and renovated a 1770 plantation house in which to stay for their many visits there. It proved so comfortable and compelling it has become their full-time home.

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AMERICA'S INGENIOUS COVERED BRIDGES

To span the many rivers and streams lacing the Northeast, inventive home builders adapted posts and beams into trusses that let heavy wagons rumble across the deepest, widest water. Adding a roof made the bridges last longer—and improved the view for today’s leaf peepers.

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PASSING THE TRADITION

Settling in Connecticut in 1996 proved a revelation for antiques dealers Susan MacKay and Peter Field, one that focused their collecting on pre-1850 New England furnishings. Now moving on with a new life-mate, Susan shares one last look at her old home and its contents.

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PAWPAWS A PLENTY

America’s largest and oldest native fruit, the pawpaw, indigenous in 26 states, is a leftover of the last Ice Age, now being rediscovered by modern chefs and brewers. Eaten from the hand, it tastes like a banana but in pies and puddings it becomes ambrosia.

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JEREMIAH LEE'S LEGACY

Although one of America’s founding patriots, Jeremiah Lee is little heralded because he died weeks after Lexington and Concord. But he left his own magnificent monument behind—his mansion in Marblehead, Massachusetts, now marking its 250th anniversary.

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MAKING A THEOREM

Early-19th-Century girls’ schools taught theorem painting because it was faster and easier than embroidering a sampler for decorating the home. But the simplicity of using stencils to make still lifes is deceptive. The best theorems have shades and depth that require painstaking preparation and precision.

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CLEVELAND'S DUNHAM TAVERN

The New England-style home built by Rufus and Jane Dunham in 1819 has stood through the growth, magnificence, decline, and revitalization of Cleveland, Ohio, earning its place as the city’s oldest building. Through the efforts of sisters Roberta Holden Bole and Delia Bulkeley White, the former tavern opened as a museum in 1941.

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Issue highlights

in every issue


FROM THE EDITOR

The Pleasures of Autumn

Jeanmarie Andrews

PLACES

The Iron Industry of Joanna Furnace

PEOPLE

Preservation through Art

James Littlefield

SKILLS

A Quick First Canning Project

EVENTS

Laura Amick

STYLE

The Gathering Season

Tess Rosch

ON THE COVER

The Walter’s Mill Covered Bridge, built in 1859, originally crossed Coxes Creek, four miles south of Somerset, Pennsylvania. Photograph by Ron Bruner.

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