October 2011

CONTENTS

2 Bittersweet

12 Engraved Powder Horns
Meant for more than keeping your powder dry, powder horns could be personal statements and works of art. Made by both amateur and professional artists, those embellished with soldiers’ names, maps, ships, figures, and animals are favorites with collectors.
22 Yours, Mine, and Ours
Carol and Darrin Heckman pooled their expertise and antiques to preserve three historic houses in tiny Bath, Pennsylvania. A father and son built two of them in the early 1800s.
34 Restoring a Rare Stone-Ender
Where Deborah Colasanti saw a falling-down Rhode Island house as a wreck, her husband, Larry Schneider, saw its potential. Restoring the stone-ender yielded history dating to the Mayflower along with 17th-Century architectural details.
44 We Gather Together
The centerpiece of civic and religious life, the meetinghouse remains the quintessential symbol of life in early New England. Photographer Paul Wainwright captures their essence in his pictorial history.
50 Farmers Rejoice
As winter approached, Pennsylvania German colonists worked to preserve—and took time to savor—the bounty of garden and pasture in the form of sausages, krauts, and pickles. We offer a selection of receipts for your period table.
54 The Spirits of Autumn
Apples, quickly introduced to America by the earliest English settlers, rewarded their planters with plenty of strong cider, enough to make it young America’s most popular drink. Cheap, healthful, easy-to-make, and alcoholic, it quenched the thirst of men, women, and children alike.
61 Stepping among the Stones
Around Halloween, cemetery tours abound, mixing history, mystery, and a lot of imagination. We offer a guide to some of our favorites.
62 Pretty Petticoats
Not just for below but meant to show, petticoats fashioned colonial times. We consulted historians, re-enactors, and seamstresses to determine what early American woman wore and how to properly reproduce the look.
70 Cornhusk Dolls
To some Native American tribes, corn served as both food staple and spiritual force. Indians harvested the husks and fashioned them into such creative forms as dolls.
80 Putting Something By

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