JUNE 2009

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the features


EYE ON ANTIQUES: SPINNING WHEELS

Common in most colonial households for spinning wool, cotton, and flax, wheels of many types are both collectible furniture and useful tools for modern spinners.

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RECLAIMING A CHARLESTON LANDMARK

Reconstructing the rubble left behind by a college and hurricane, then restoring its classical ornamentation, Gene and Betsy Johnson revived an 1806 Federal estate.

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CONNECTICUT BECKONS

While a child in her native Brazil, Liliana Damasceno dreamed of owning a New England saltbox. She found her dream in the 1751 Amos Richardson house.

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RECLAIMING THE LAND OF LINCOLN

An accident stranded a young Abraham Lincoln in New Salem, Illinois, but six years in the town turned him from shopkeeper to lawyer and eventually our 16th president.

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OLD ROSES

Colonial gardeners loved roses, but not today’s tiny bushes with tightly spiraled fl owers. They enjoyed the sprawling, fragrant old roses of Europe—and you can, too.

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LIFE IN EARLY AMERICA: THE FIRST LINERS

Packet ships were the first to establish scheduled sailing dates, an innovation that helped make America’s merchant marine the world’s leader and New York the greatest port.

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A COLONIAL GARDEN IN A DAY

Even colonial city-dwellers kept gardens. We show you how to build a raised-bed garden perfect for gathering fresh vegetables and herbs at your kitchen doorstep.

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SIDE BY SIDE: FACES IN BLACK AND WHITE

A monochromatic profile captures personalities surprisingly well, so silhouettes became popular as cheap portraits in the late 1700s and 1800s. Traditional artisans have revived the art.

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