ABOUT_US

Who We Are

Our History

FAQ

Policies

Contact Us

GET INVOLVED

Sell EAL

Link to Us

Frequently Asked Questions


When did Early American Life start publishing?

The first issue of Early American Life came out as January/February 1970, edited by Jim Betts and published by the Early American Society, Inc. 

 

Is your magazine related to Early American Homes?

We are the same magazine. From 1997 to 2000 a previous publisher changed the name of the magazine from Early American Life to Early American Homes. To put it simply, no one liked the change so the publisher switched it back to the old name, which we continue today. Consequently any complete collection of Early American Life will include several years of Early American Homes. The staff, content, and focus of the magazine remained the same throughout all the changes. 

 

How often is Early American Life published? 

We publish Early American Life seven times a year.

Six issues are published bi-monthly, which means every other month. Each issue covers two months and is designated by the second of the two. That is, the calendar in our February issue, for example, covers the months of January and February. Our production schedule is timed so that subscribers should receive each copy of the magazine before the first of the two months covered by an issue.

Our seventh issue is our Christmas issue which includes a special crafts guide. It is published at the end of September. 

 

How much does Early American Life cost?

The U.S. cover price of the magazine is $5.99 for current issues (except Christmas, which is $6.99), but we allow retailers the flexibility to price and discount the magazine as suits their business. We sell subscriptions directly and offer you a substantial discount off the cover price for subscriptions of one or two full years. The current price for a one-year subscription is $24.00; two years is $46.00. We now also offer three-year subscriptions for $66, which saves you six dollars off the regular annual rate. Because of the high cost of postage, we charge more for subscriptions to Canada, currently $33 per year (in U.S. funds).

The postage situation to more distant nations has become quite expensive and varies with each nation to which we deliver. Consquently we no longer quote a flat subscription price for nations beyond Canada, but we will make arrangements for foreign delivery on a case-by-case basis. (Because of recent postal rate increases, it now costs us roughly $9.00 to ship one issue to a European nation, so the cost for a subscription will work out to be about $86 per year in U.S. funds. Call or email for an exact quote.)

Unlike other magazines, we do not discount regular subscriptions with special offers and the like. The reason is that Early American Life is chiefly supported by its subscribers. Most other magazines receive most of their income from advertising. We could adopt an advertising-supported business model and offer subscription discounts, but the magazine would not be the same—it would have to be dominated by advertising. We believe our subscribers want Early American Life to be just as it is, with a modest amount of advertising that’s relevant to the interests of the reader.

 

Can I buy Early American Life on the newsstand?

Yes. Early American Life is distributed to newsstands by Curtis Circulation Company (the largest newsstand distributor in the country), and it is available to all newsstands. Of course, each newsstand operator must order the magazine from Curtis or a wholesaler that Curtis deals with. If your news dealer does not carry Early American Life, ask your  news dealer to order it from his distributor. You can also buy the magazine from a number of antique, craft, and decorating shops across the country. Click here to find a store near you.

 

Why don’t you answer your phone?

We do. In the week that an issue is mailed, we’re usually flooded with calls and may not be able to answer as quickly as you would like (and we may sometimes miss getting your call in time). If you can’t get through, be patient. If you call after the initial rush of calls. you’ll have a better chance of getting through, and we’ll be able to devote more time to helping you. We are not a huge company and we maintain normal business hours in the Eastern time zone. We do answer some after-hours calls, but we can’t guarantee we’ll catch everyone who calls at odd times. 

 

Why is my magazine late?

We get a lot of calls from people wanting to know where their magazine is—their friends received a copy, why didn’t they? We don’t know. We mail all copies of the magazine to all of our subscription list at exactly the same time. After that, delivery is in the hands of the postal service. Any difference in delivery results from the vagaries of the postal system (which deals with billions of letters and magazines). In general, people often receive their copies of Early American Life within a few days of the time we mail it. But it is not unusual for some copies to arrive as long as three weeks later. 

In other words, please be patient. But if you do suspect a problem with your delivery, give our subscription department a call at 800-446-1696. 

 

I have a store and want to offer Early American Life to my customers. What do I do?

Please contact us. We will be happy to make arrangements with you to carry the magazine in your store. The best way to reach us is by email at retail@firelandsmedia.com.

 

Can I arrange for you to appear at our show or have a booth? Can you arrange a speaker for my club or group?

We try to appear at shows throughout the year, but we are a small magazine with a modest staff so we can't be everywhere. We consider each request on a case-by-case basis, and our decision is based primarily on staff availability. There are also substantial costs involved in representing ourselves at shows, and we've found we cannot make it up in volume. We recommend you give a call to Alex Dreka at 440-543-8566 to see if we can work something out.

We sometimes speak to clubs and other groups but we usually schedule such events for times when we'll be nearby to save wear and tear on our staff. Again, call and we'll see if we can work something out.

 

Didn't you people go out of business?

No. Firelands Media Group LLC has successfully published Early American Life since 2003. However, the previous publisher, Celtic Moon Publishing Inc., did go bankrupt that year. The principals involved in Firelands did not want to see the magazine go out of business, so they bought the magazine from the United States Bankruptcy Court in September, 2003. Firelands has no affiliation or relationship with the previous publisher.

 

My collection is missing the May/June 2003, July/August 2003 and September/October 2003 issues, and I cannot find them anywhere. Can I buy them from you?

The three issues above were not  published and never will be. The old publisher went out of business before those issues could be produced. For the same reason, there was no separate Christmas issue in 2003. Publication resumed with new publishers and the December 2003 issue. The Directory of Traditional American Crafts (the top 200 craftsman in America), which was scheduled for July/August 2003 issue, appears in the December 2003 issue.